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  • 0 comments  /  posted by  Silverlight Show  on  Feb 20, 2012 (more than a year ago)
    Tags:   windows-8 , winrt , xaml , gill-cleeren

    At the beginning of the new year, SilverlightShow articles and ebooks author Gill Cleeren delighted our readers with his new series titled 'Windows 8 and the future of XAML'. You can read the first two parts here: Part 1: An overview of the Windows 8 platform & Part 2: The Windows Runtime (WinRT).

    We are glad to announce that today we published the next article from this series:

    Windows 8 and the future of XAML: Part 3: Using WinRT

    In this post, Gill starts writing code that makes use of WinRT components. After some “Hello Worlds”, he dives in more advanced concepts including Capabilities, the Share contract, working with the webcam and some more.

    Check out the currently planned TOC for the whole series posted in our Forums, and feel free to suggest more topics for inclusion.

    If you are looking for gaining experience in developing Metro apps, then you may also want to watch the recorded two-part webinar on "Metro and WinRT for the Silverlight/WPF Developer" which Gill recently delivered for SilverlightShow. Watch recording of Part 1 | Watch recording of Part 2

    More parts from Gill's Windows 8 article series are coming each week so stay tuned (via RSS, Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn and/or Google+)!



  • 0 comments  /  posted by  Silverlight Show  on  Feb 20, 2012 (more than a year ago)

    Read original post by Peter Kuhn at Mister Goodcat

    There's a ton of resources available on the web that talks about the new features of Windows Phone 7.5 "Mango" for developers, and about background agents in particular. Unfortunately, a lot of these resources use over-simplified samples that have little in common with complex real-world setups, and often the articles you can find don't even mention the several restrictions in place for background agents at all. In this open-ended mini series I am going to talk about the various problems you will potentially run into with anything but the most trivial applications, what effects and consequences this has for your application development, and how you can avoid pitfalls and plan ahead for background agents. This is not a general introduction on the topic; I assume that you are familiar with the concept and have a basic understanding on how agents work.

  • 0 comments  /  posted by  Silverlight Show  on  Feb 20, 2012 (more than a year ago)

    Read original post by Mike Kruzeniski at The Windows Phone Developer Blog

    In November, myself and Albert Shum drove a few hours north to visit our friends at the Vancouver User Experience Meetup, to talk about Metro and the design philosophy behind Windows Phone. The beginning of the presentation traced the roots of the Windows Phone Metro design language, a topic we’ve spoken about at a number of developer conferences (Watch Albert at MIX 2010). From there, we decided to push the discussion a bit further this time, to look at where we see Metro going next. As you can imagine, this was a lot of fun. Our presentation was over an hour long and covered a lot of material, so rather than just posting the slides up, I’ll describe the talk in its four parts. First, the story of Metro.

  • 0 comments  /  posted by  Silverlight Show  on  Feb 20, 2012 (more than a year ago)

    Read original post by Den Delimarsky at DZone

    If you are working with XAML at any level, you should use binding for any data that you are handling in your application. And if you don't use binding, then you probably should - both for convenience and future compatibility purposes. But that's beyond the point of this article. With many Windows Phone applications that I work on, there is one common thing I noticed - the binding harness is almost always the same, with small modifications adapted to a specific project structure.

  • 0 comments  /  posted by  Silverlight Show  on  Feb 20, 2012 (more than a year ago)

    Read original post by Fran Moreno at Antares Lair Blog

    We, users of the Windows Phone OS, love its fluidity and how content is populated smoothly throughout the OS (take for example how album thumbnails are loaded in the Pictures Hub).

    As developers, we don’t have any built-in mechanism to populate content this way, but we can fix that by using transitions, storyboards and behaviors. For this post, we will create two classes: OpacityTransition and OnLoadedOpacityBehavior.

  • 0 comments  /  posted by  Silverlight Show  on  Feb 20, 2012 (more than a year ago)

    Read original post by András Velvárt at Dotneteers

    This is Part 2 of the translation of the performance chapter of the Windows Phone developer book I co-authored with many of my Hungarian peers. Other parts of this series can be found here.

    We finished the previous part discussing the roles of the CPU and the GPU in the phone. Let’s see an example of the CPU’s task!

  • 0 comments  /  posted by  Silverlight Show  on  Feb 20, 2012 (more than a year ago)

    Read original post at Kunal's Blog

    If you are using Windows Phone 7 and want to activate the “Call Waiting Service”, this post will help you. You might came to this page by search engines if didn’t find any settings to activate this service in your phone. This post is not related to any sort of programming but just a small usages tips.

  • 0 comments  /  posted by  Silverlight Show  on  Feb 20, 2012 (more than a year ago)

    Read original post by Laurent Bugnion at GalaSoft

    If you tried to build applications for Windows 8 with XAML/C#, you may have noticed an annoying issue: If you have a list controls (for example a GridView) and you bind the ItemsSource property to a property of type ObservableCollection<Something> on your ViewModel, the GridView is not updated when the collection’s content changes. The CollectionChanged event is raised properly, but it is not honored by the binding system.

    Thankfully, this is a temporary bug, and it should be solved in the Consumer Preview version of Windows 8, due for release end of February. In the meantime, however, it is easy to circumvent this bug.

  • 0 comments  /  posted by  Silverlight Show  on  Feb 20, 2012 (more than a year ago)
    Tags:   wpf , windows-phone , prism

    Download Prism 4.1 at Microsoft Download Center

    Prism provides guidance designed to help you more easily design and build rich, flexible, and easy to maintain Windows Presentation Foundation (WPF) desktop applications and Silverlight Rich Internet Applications (RIAs) and Windows Phone 7.1 ("Mango") applications. Using design patterns that embody important architectural design principles, such as separation of concerns and loose coupling, Prism helps you to design and build applications using loosely coupled components that can evolve independently but which can be easily and seamlessly integrated into the overall application. Such applications are known as often referred to as composite applications.

    NOTE: If you are interested in Prism, you may also take a look at this ongoing SilverlightShow article series (4 parts available as of 2/20/2012) by Brian Noyes: "Working with Prism 4".

  • 0 comments  /  posted by  Silverlight Show  on  Feb 20, 2012 (more than a year ago)
    Tags:   wpf , mvvm , mark-heath

    Read original post by Mark Heath at Sound Code

    In this episode I walk through adding a new feature, the ability to cancel switching between modules, which turns out to be a bit more tricky than we might have anticipated, and ends up with us creating a templated list of buttons to replace our original ListBox. (n.b. an even better choice might have been to use a tab control, but I didn’t think of that when I created this tutorial, so maybe that can be another refactoring for a future episode).


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