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  • 0 comments  /  posted by  Silverlight Show  on  Sep 15, 2009 (more than a year ago)

    For his recent visualization, Matthias Shapiro creates a custom control in Silverlight that animates the color of a Path every time a “Fill” property on the control is changed.

    First thing I learned was that you cannot use TemplateBinding in a Storyboard (I think). I asked this question on Stack Overflow and I haven’t gotten an answer. But I’m pretty sure that in Silverlight you cannot use TemplateBinding to attach a property to a KeyFrame value. This means that you have to have a pointer in the control code the allows access to the KeyFrame so you can update the value. I’ll walk through the conceptual part of animating a property in a Custom Control in Sivlerlight and then walk through the code to it.



  • 0 comments  /  posted by  Silverlight Show  on  Mar 26, 2012 (more than a year ago)
    Find out more about the "Calcium" framework developed by Daniel Vaughan at CodePlex

    Calcium is a composite application toolset. It provides much of what you need to rapidly build multifaceted and sophisticated modular applications for WPF and Windows Phone.

    Calcium comes in two flavours: Calcium for WPF and Calcium for Windows Phone.

  • 0 comments  /  posted by  Silverlight Show  on  Mar 09, 2012 (more than a year ago)

    Read original post at Rockford Lhotka's Blog

    At a time when many organizations are moving from Windows XP or 2000 to Windows 7, the last thing a lot of people want to think about is Windows 8. At the same time, it is incredibly clear that the future of client computing is undergoing a major shift thanks to the rapid growth of iPad and other tablet devices. Windows 8 is not only the next desktop operating system from Microsoft, but it is also Microsoft’s answer to this substantial shift toward low-power touch-based client devices.

    This change impacts not only the operating system, but the underlying application development model. The new Windows Runtime (WinRT) development platform represents an evolution for .NET developers, and a significant shift for non-.NET developers.

  • 0 comments  /  posted by  Silverlight Show  on  Feb 24, 2012 (more than a year ago)

    Watch this video with Ben Riga at DZone

    Windows Phone is available is in 35+ countries around the world. What better way to expand the availability of your application than to make it available in the native language of your end-users. In this session we’ll explore the best practices for localizing your app. We’ll cover the basics for localizing apps as well as app titles and live tiles. We’ll also cover various services and tools that can get you started faster and refine your localization.

  • 0 comments  /  posted by  Silverlight Show  on  Sep 13, 2012 (more than a year ago)
    Tags:   windows-8 , winrt , greg-duncan

    Read original post by Greg Duncan at Channel 9

    In out WinRT Wednesday post we're featuring a toolkit to help you build your apps faster, letting you focus on adding cool features and not worrying about plumbing. We're talking one official boat load of cool features, controls and capabilities... Free!

  • 0 comments  /  posted by  Silverlight Show  on  Aug 24, 2009 (more than a year ago)
    Tags:   Physics , behaviours
    In this post Andy Beaulieu describes adding Behaviors at runtime for the Physics Helper Behaviors.

    These behaviors are a little different in that they are dependent on a PhysicsControllerBehavior as kind of a “master controller.” There are also dependencies for some of the other Behaviors – for example a PhysicsJointBehavior depends on the existence of a PhysicsObjectBehavior for the bodies it is joining. So there is an additional call necessary for some of the Physics Behaviors (this may be fixed in a future release).

  • 0 comments  /  posted by  Silverlight Show  on  Feb 02, 2011 (more than a year ago)

    SilverlightShow Page for all Silverlight and Windows Phone 7 (WP7) things on Twitter Here is the second Silverlight for WP7 programming tip of Jeff Prosise.

    Source: Jeff Prosise's Blog

    Phone developers sometimes bemoan the fact that Silverlight for Windows Phone lacks syndication classes such as SyndicationFeed and SyndicationItem. In the desktop versions of Silverlight, these classes simplify the task of consuming RSS feeds, as well as other types of feeds such as ATOM.

  • 1 comments  /  posted by  Silverlight Show  on  Jan 28, 2011 (more than a year ago)
    SilverlightShow Page for all Silverlight and Windows Phone 7 (WP7) things on Twitter

    This week on Silverlight TV, John Papa goes behind the scenes with some folks who are responsible for testing and getting the Silverlight bits out to the public.

    Source: Channel 9

    Andy Rivas, Program Manager on Silverlight, shares what he does and how the bits get "baked" and into your hands. He also discusses the various ways you can provide feedback (bugs, requests, questions, etc). Other topics Andy discusses include: 

        • What is the testing process like? 
        • What's a GDR?
  • 0 comments  /  posted by  Silverlight Show  on  May 02, 2012 (more than a year ago)

    Read original post at Pavan Pareta's Blog

    Very long time and back to work, just for curiosity about how to access “WMAppManifest.xml”; using silverlight c# code in Windows Phone application. In this article we will discuss Application Manifest file called WMAppManifest.xml file and it is available in Properties folder of your project in the Solution Explorer. Manifest file contains details about the application, such as the App ID Title, RuntimeType, Version, Genre, Author, Description, Publisher and the application capabilities.

  • 0 comments  /  posted by  Silverlight Show  on  May 02, 2011 (more than a year ago)
    SilverlightShow Page for all Silverlight and Windows Phone 7 (WP7) things on Twitter

    Dennis Delimarsky explains how to work with the Maps application without actually having the app accessible in the main menu.

    Source: Den by default

    By default the Windows Phone emulator is pretty limited in terms of applications that are available out-of-the-box. In fact, Internet Explorer is the only application that is available – the rest are apps that are side-loaded.

    I already talked about a way to invoke the default YouTube application and about some other hidden call-related features. Today I found an interesting new access point that allows me to work with the Maps application without actually having the app accessible in the main menu.


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