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  • 0 comments  /  posted by  Silverlight Show  on  Mar 26, 2012 (more than a year ago)
    Tags:   ebooks , contest

    Update (4/9/2012): The winners from the first two weeks in our Twitter Contest were already selected. See who grabbed the free ebooks from Week 1 and Week 2! The next ebook that you can win is "Windows Phone 7 for Silverlight Developers" by András Velvárt. More info >>


    Hey - how about winning some FREE ebooks from SilverlightShow, with just a single tweet? Read on!

    Each week, for the next 1 month, three of you will have the chance to win a title from SilverlightShow Ebook Shelf with just a single tweet! In these giveaways, we'll be choosing between our bestselling ebooks - Getting Ready for Microsoft Silverlight Exam 70-506, WCF RIA Services, Developing real-world Applications with LightSwitch, Windows Phone 7.5 Fundamentals and more...

    How to enter the contest? It's simple:

    1. Follow us on Twitter @SilverlightShow
    2. See which is the Win-with-a-tweet ebook for the week. We'll announce a new one every Monday.
    3. Tweet this ebook using hashtag #silverlightshowebook (or using the sample tweet you may find along with the weekly ebook announcement).

    The winners will be randomly picked and announced each Monday on SilverlightShow.net.

    The ebook of this week is:

    Getting Ready for Microsoft Silverlight Exam 70-506

    Tweet this ebook using hashtag #silverlightshowebook. Or feel free to use this sample tweet text:

    ------------------------------------
    Ebook by @gillcleeren and @silverlightshow 'Getting Ready for MS #Silverlight Exam 70-506' http://slshow.net/pfmoP7 #silverlightshowebook
    ------------------------------------

    Tweet now!

    To enter the weekly giveaway, tweet this ebook until April 1st, 2012

    The three winners will be announced on April 2nd on SilverlightShow.

    Good luck!
     



  • 0 comments  /  posted by  Silverlight Show  on  Mar 26, 2012 (more than a year ago)
    Tags:   windows-8 , don-norman

    Read this interview with Don Norman at TabTimes

    The cofounder of the Nielsen Norman Group discusses Microsoft's challenges and opportunities with Windows 8, and why it might actually be superior to Android and iOS.

    The Nielsen Norman Group is a highly respected consulting firm in the area of user experience and usability. Norman, who’s resume includes stints as a VP at Apple and executive at HP, says his work is focused on helping technology companies structure their product lines and business with an emphasis on design strategy.

  • 0 comments  /  posted by  Silverlight Show  on  Mar 26, 2012 (more than a year ago)

    Read original post by Joost van Schaik at .NET by Example

    With more and more Marketplaces being added to the Windows Phone ecosystem, globalization of your app becomes all the more more important. I am happy to see a lot of apps these days support multiple languages. I usually employ a solution described in my article MVVMLight based language selection for Windows Phone 7 – this automatically picks up the language from the phone and defaults to English/US if that’s not supported by the app. But I also like to give the user the chance to override the automatically selected language. I, for instance, run the phone OS in English/US, but I’d like specific Dutch apps to run in Dutch, thank you. But if you follow the globalization example as described by MSDN using my code, that unfortunately requires the app to be restarted after applying the language change. Well, no more!

  • 0 comments  /  posted by  Silverlight Show  on  Mar 26, 2012 (more than a year ago)
    Find out more about the "Calcium" framework developed by Daniel Vaughan at CodePlex

    Calcium is a composite application toolset. It provides much of what you need to rapidly build multifaceted and sophisticated modular applications for WPF and Windows Phone.

    Calcium comes in two flavours: Calcium for WPF and Calcium for Windows Phone.

  • 0 comments  /  posted by  Silverlight Show  on  Mar 26, 2012 (more than a year ago)

    Read original post at Geert van der Cruijsen's Blog

    I’m building a Windows Phone app where I want to compare 2 objects to each other visually by showing graphs on how good each of the objects is performing. because I like to use the accent color in my apps I was thinking of what would be a good second color for the other graph. Since I’m not a designer I did some research on colors and found out that every color has a complementary color that is exactly the opposite color of your primary color. (Probably some basic design knowledge I didn’t know that.

  • 0 comments  /  posted by  Silverlight Show  on  Mar 26, 2012 (more than a year ago)

    Read original post at Brian Lagunas's Blog

    If you have done any WPF application development I am sure you have used and fallen in love with the Static markup extension. If you’re are not familiar with it, the Static markup extension allows you to reference static fields and properties in your XAML markup. [...]

    Unfortunately if you are also doing any Silverlight development you will soon find that this wonderful and useful extension does NOT exist in Silverlight. Luckily for us in Silverlight 5 we were given the ability to write our own custom markup extensions

  • 0 comments  /  posted by  Silverlight Show  on  Mar 26, 2012 (more than a year ago)

    Read original post by Kirupa Chinnathambi and Jeffrey Ferman at BlendInsider

    When you are designing new apps, you will want to make sure they can be viewed across various orientations and states. For a detailed discussion about design considerations for view states, orientations, and resolutions in Windows 8 be sure to read Scaling to different screens on the Building Windows 8 blog.

  • 0 comments  /  posted by  Silverlight Show  on  Mar 26, 2012 (more than a year ago)

    Read original post at Vivien Chevallier's Blog

    So that you don't need to submit your application to get it's id and resubmit it.
    For my future WP7 application Warnygo, I needed to get its id for several reasons. For example, use it with the ShareLinkTask or send it to my services.
    As you may know, you can find your application id in the WMAppManifest.xml. It's the ProductID attribute in the App node.

    When you first create your application with Visual Studio, you get a random one. But you will get a new one through the marketplace submission process. So how to get your application id in your application once submitted?

  • 0 comments  /  posted by  Silverlight Show  on  Mar 26, 2012 (more than a year ago)
    Tags:   wpf , steve-smith

    Read original post Steve Smith at Ardalis

    I’ve been bitten by this and have seen others run into it enough times that I thought I’d blog about it. Let’s say you’re creating a new Console, WPF, or Windows Forms application in .NET 4. You’re using Visual Studio 2010, and everything is going great until you get to the part where you wanted to make an HTTP request. You know you can do this, you’ve done it before, heck, you might even be copying code straight out of MSDN that does what you need. But it doesn’t compile.

  • 0 comments  /  posted by  Silverlight Show  on  Mar 26, 2012 (more than a year ago)

    Read original post by Derek Gebhard at Windows 8 App Developer Blog

    When you start writing Metro style apps you’ll quickly come across contracts, a new and powerful concept in Windows 8. Metro style apps use contracts to declare interactions they support with other apps and with Windows. You’ve probably already heard about some of them: search, share, etc. Using contracts, apps become better by working with the system or with each other when users install more apps that implement contracts. In this post I’ll walk you through activation, one of the main concepts to think about as you add contracts to your apps.


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